tardisblue4

jenzapokemonrawr:

talknerdytome33:

feminismordeath:

badassperger:

caseyandsons:

bxneyard:

soulsuccubus:

thedaysofforever:

HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAH

I never usually laugh at these, but I literally just lost it

Lololol

Tears are streaming down my face oh my god

help

"I am getting fisted right now" omfg

this made me hysterical help

i’m dyinggg

AUTO CUCUMBER

I am literally crying and can’t breathe

I swear I can hear a voice shouting DONG! over and over again, In my head right now.

oh auto correct

tardisblue4

airyairyquitecontrary:

squeakykins:

das-uberchicken:

worksofwalt:

Okay. So there’s a theory out there about this movie that I’m going to throw out to you all. I’m not sure I agree with it, but at the same time, I’m not sure I don’t. It really makes a lot of sense if you think about it, but I fairly confident it was not a planned story by the creators of the movie. But it certainly fits. So here goes.

The Great Stone Dragon is featured three times in the movie: First, Mulan stands beside the statue when she sings about how she wishes her outside would match her inside, and that her actions and appearances were in line with her inner character. Second, Mulan sits on the base of the statue watching her father pass his final night before going off to war, it is here that she makes her decision to take his place. And the third time is when the ancestors attempt – and fail – to awaken the spirit.

So why does the statue crumble? Because it’s empty. Because the spirit of the Great Stone Dragon has already awakened and given Mulan the strength she needed to make her decision and go to war in her father’s stead. Mulan woke the dragon (calm down, Viserys) when she sang ‘Reflection’ beside him, and he gave her his spirit when she sat in the rain watching her father, passing to her all of the strength of the Great Stone Dragon. So when the ancestors try to wake him, he’s already gone.

Anyway that’s the theory. As I said, I don’t know that I buy into it, but it certainly makes a lot of sense. 

My childhood just got more beautiful

I’d always wondered why it didn’t work! Honestly this theory makes perfect sense. The spirit wasn’t there to talk her OUT of going to war, it was there to give her the strength and courage to do it in the first place.

And it means that the statue wasn’t a DUD, the ancestors just didn’t understand how it worked.

deadpresidents

Bill Clinton’s Famous Lip Bite

deadpresidents:

image

Bill Clinton is famously, and sometimes mockingly, remembered for biting his lip before he prepared to say something.  At times, it seemed corny or even smarmy, and on Saturday Night Live, it became a staple of the great Phil Hartman’s impression of Clinton during the Clinton Administration. The mannerism was usually followed with a comment like, “I feel your pain.”

However, in Michael Takiff’s awesome oral history of Bill Clinton, A Complicated Man, it is revealed that there was much more to Clinton’s lip biting than a goofy quirk. In fact, it was a calculated action — a speed bump for the lightning quick thoughts of one of the most intellectually powerful and supremely gifted politicians in American history.  Clinton’s longtime aide and one of the driving forces of his 1992 Presidential campaign, Paul Begala, says that Clinton was trained to do the lip biting because Clinton answered questions so quickly that it almost seemed unnatural.

According to Begala:

He was so smart about so many things but also could connect.  The whole thing about his biting his lip — that was coached.  Because he would answer so fast.  We’d say, ‘Take a beat.  Pretend you’re thinking about it.  Pretend you haven’t already got an answer.’  It was a studied thing to give himself a second to force himself to slow down.”

wilwheaton
wilwheaton:

maxistentialist:

Techdirt:

In order to protect their dominant market share, Keurig makers Green Mountain Coffee Roasters has been on a bit of an aggressive tear of late. As with computer printers, getting the device in the home is simply a gateway to where the real money is: refills. But Keurig has faced the “problem” in recent years of third-party pod refills that often retail for 5-25% less than what Keurig charges. As people look to cut costs, there has also been a growing market for reusable pods that generally run anywhere from five to fifteen dollars.
Keurig’s solution to this problem? In a lawsuit (pdf) filed against Keurig by TreeHouse Foods, they claim Keurig has been busy striking exclusionary agreements with suppliers and distributors to lock competing products out of the market. What’s more, TreeHouse points out that Keurig is now developing a new version of their coffee maker that will incorporate the java-bean equivalent of DRM — so that only Keurig’s own coffee pods can be used in it.

Friends don’t let friends use pod coffee makers.

FRIENDS DON’T LET FRIENDS USE POD COFFEE MAKERS.

This is such an idiotic, anti-consumer move

wilwheaton:

maxistentialist:

Techdirt:

In order to protect their dominant market share, Keurig makers Green Mountain Coffee Roasters has been on a bit of an aggressive tear of late. As with computer printers, getting the device in the home is simply a gateway to where the real money is: refills. But Keurig has faced the “problem” in recent years of third-party pod refills that often retail for 5-25% less than what Keurig charges. As people look to cut costs, there has also been a growing market for reusable pods that generally run anywhere from five to fifteen dollars.

Keurig’s solution to this problem? In a lawsuit (pdf) filed against Keurig by TreeHouse Foods, they claim Keurig has been busy striking exclusionary agreements with suppliers and distributors to lock competing products out of the market. What’s more, TreeHouse points out that Keurig is now developing a new version of their coffee maker that will incorporate the java-bean equivalent of DRM — so that only Keurig’s own coffee pods can be used in it.

Friends don’t let friends use pod coffee makers.

FRIENDS DON’T LET FRIENDS USE POD COFFEE MAKERS.

This is such an idiotic, anti-consumer move