politicalprof
politicalprof:

theatlantic:


Why Are College Textbooks So Absurdly Expensive?


You thought the rising cost of college tuition was bad? Then check out the rising cost of college textbooks. The American Enterprise Institute’s Mark Perry has put together this chart showing the egregious, 812 percent rise in the cost of course materials since 1978, as captured in the Bureau of Labor Statistics’s consumer price index data. The price of all those Intro to Sociology and Calculus books have shot up faster than health-care, home prices, and, of course, inflation.
Read more.




Politicalprof: God I hate these “analyses.”
Speaking as an actual professor with 22 1/2 years of experience in this matter:
1. I ALWAYS CONSIDER THE PRICE OF A TEXT. So does pretty much everyone else I know. The “the professors don’t think about price” comment is both tired and intellectually lazy.
2. I HAVE NEVER BUNDLED A TEXT TO SOFTWARE OR SUPPLEMENTS. I know that’s a game, too. Bundles are not why prices go up.
3. THESE PIECES NEVER DISCUSS THE USED BOOK MARKET IN A REAL WAY. As a simple fact, the used book market means that the sales cycle of any new book today is all of one semester. After that, the book is in the used book market (even without evil bundles), and neither the author nor the publisher sees another penny. So publishers (and trust me, it’s the publishers who push this) act “rationally” and jack their prices up every new edition, all while pumping out new editions as fast as possible. Books used to have sales cycles of several years. Now they have sales cycles of one semester. 
Ironically, then, the act students take to save money (selling and buying used books) drives the cost of books ever upwards.
This is economics, people, not speculation. It may lead to books pricing themselves out of a market, or, more likely, to the emergence of lower-cost alternatives. (As an aside, when I discussed a FREE online alternative with my class, they admitted they basically never use e-books, so I don’t think that’s a real alternative yet.) But it’s why prices go up, not mystery bundles.
Are textbook prices a problem? Yes. But to fix the problem one needs to understand it, and dumb analyses like these in no way lend themselves to understanding or solving the problem.

politicalprof:

theatlantic:

Why Are College Textbooks So Absurdly Expensive?

You thought the rising cost of college tuition was bad? Then check out the rising cost of college textbooks. The American Enterprise Institute’s Mark Perry has put together this chart showing the egregious, 812 percent rise in the cost of course materials since 1978, as captured in the Bureau of Labor Statistics’s consumer price index data. The price of all those Intro to Sociology and Calculus books have shot up faster than health-care, home prices, and, of course, inflation.

Read more.

Politicalprof: God I hate these “analyses.”

Speaking as an actual professor with 22 1/2 years of experience in this matter:

1. I ALWAYS CONSIDER THE PRICE OF A TEXT. So does pretty much everyone else I know. The “the professors don’t think about price” comment is both tired and intellectually lazy.

2. I HAVE NEVER BUNDLED A TEXT TO SOFTWARE OR SUPPLEMENTS. I know that’s a game, too. Bundles are not why prices go up.

3. THESE PIECES NEVER DISCUSS THE USED BOOK MARKET IN A REAL WAY. As a simple fact, the used book market means that the sales cycle of any new book today is all of one semester. After that, the book is in the used book market (even without evil bundles), and neither the author nor the publisher sees another penny. So publishers (and trust me, it’s the publishers who push this) act “rationally” and jack their prices up every new edition, all while pumping out new editions as fast as possible. Books used to have sales cycles of several years. Now they have sales cycles of one semester. 

Ironically, then, the act students take to save money (selling and buying used books) drives the cost of books ever upwards.

This is economics, people, not speculation. It may lead to books pricing themselves out of a market, or, more likely, to the emergence of lower-cost alternatives. (As an aside, when I discussed a FREE online alternative with my class, they admitted they basically never use e-books, so I don’t think that’s a real alternative yet.) But it’s why prices go up, not mystery bundles.

Are textbook prices a problem? Yes. But to fix the problem one needs to understand it, and dumb analyses like these in no way lend themselves to understanding or solving the problem.

fishingboatproceeds

On Self-Publishing and Amazon

fishingboatproceeds:

From Amy: “Seeing your facebook posts in relation to self-publishing today, i’m very curious as to why you seem to be so upset when continuously you encourage self publishing of other media. Just look at Vlogbrothers itself. In fact, you addressed this in Hitler and Sex. What about all of the amazing musicians that DFTBA Records picked up. The internet enabled these people to get out there and start something big. Why are books not okay?”

I haven’t sorted my feelings out, and I may be inconsistent/wrong. But to be clear: I did not intend to attack or criticize self-publishing itself. Many great books are being self-published, and that has been the case for centuries.

I wanted to criticize Jeff Bezos, the CEO of Amazon, because I felt that in his introduction of the new kindles, Bezos repeatedly peddled the lie that a book is created by one person, and that therefore a book’s author should be the sole entity to profit from the sale of the book. (Aside, of course, from Amazon itself.)

Bezos and Amazon are consistent in their promotion of this lie, because it encourages the idea that the publishing landscape today is bloated and inefficient and that there is a better, cheaper way to do it—a way where all books can cost $1.99 with most of that $1.99 going to the author. Readers and writers both win then, right?

Well, no. Because the truth is, most good books are NOT created solely by one person: Editors and publishers play a tremendously important role not just in the distribution of books, but in the creation of them. Without my editor, there would be no great perhaps in Looking for Alaska, no Augustus Waters in The Fault in Our Stars, and no Agloe, New York in Paper Towns. Without copyeditors and proofreaders, my books would be riddled with factual and grammatical errors that would pull you out of the story and give you a less immersive reading experience. Publishers add value, and lots of it, and without them the overall quality and diversity of books will suffer.

There is lots of room in this world for indie publishing, and I’m excited about all the reading opportunities that the Internet has given us, from blogs to fan fiction to direct-to-ereader novels. But comparing publishing to music or TV is really troubling to me, because people listen to a lot of music: In an average week, I probably listen to 200 songs. I probably watch 5 hours of television or YouTube. But in an average week, I read one book (and that puts me on the far end of the reading bell curve among Americans). Given how few books are read—perhaps 500 million a year—the current publishing landscape does an astonishingly good job of making sure there are plenty of books available to a wide variety of audiences. There are books about little people who survived the Holocaust and the Islamization of the Uzbeks and how to swing a golf club.

My fear is that if there are only two or three voices in the publishing retail landscape—say, Wal-Mart, Target, and Amazon—that diversity will dramatically decrease. Only a few dozen books a year will be available at large retailers like Wal-Mart; the rest of literature will exist only in the kindle store. Those books will have difficulty being discovered, because there are so few readers and so many titles. (You are starting to see a similar phenomenon on YouTube right now, actually, but in publishing it will be far worse, because it usually only takes a few minutes to watch a YouTube video.)

Here’s my concern: What will happen to the next generation’s Toni Morrison? How will she—a brilliant, Nobel-worthy writer who doesn’t have a huge built-in audience—get the financial and editorial support her talent deserves? (You’ll note that there’s no self-published literary fiction anywhere near the kindle bestseller lists.) Amazon will have absolutely no investment in that writer, and they won’t need to. Over time, I’m worried this lack of investment will hurt the quality and breadth of literature we actually read, even if literature remains broadly available.

So my issue is not with self-publishing. My issue is with Bezos profiting from this false narrative that an Amazon monopoly will benefit both readers and writers. In truth, I don’t think it will benefit anyone. In the long run, I don’t even think it will benefit Amazon, because if they succeed in destroying publishers, the quality of the books they sell will suffer, and even fewer people will be inclined to spend their evenings reading.

fishingboatproceeds

Why Libraries Are Different From Piracy

fishingboatproceeds:

Yesterday on twitter, I expressed annoyance with the hundreds of people who send me emails or tumblr messages or whatever to let me know that they illegally downloaded one of my books, as if they expect me to reply with my hearty congratulations that they are technologically sophisticated enough to use google or whatever. (I dislike it when people pirate my books. I know that not all authors feel this way, but I do. As I’ve discussed before, I think copyright law is disastrously stupid in the US, but I don’t think piracy is an appropriate response to that stupidity.*)

I then pointed out that my books are already available for free at thousands of public libraries not just in the US, but also in Europe, South America, Australia, Canada, Mexico, South Africa, the UK, etc., to which many people replied, What’s the difference between pirating a book and checking it out from the library?

1. Libraries are broadly collecting institutions curated by experts. The curation facet of a library is hugely important: We train these librarians to organize information based not solely on what is popular (which is what piracy does), but also on what is good. The truth is you can’t get “anything” via piracy; there are hundreds of thousands of books you can’t get, because they aren’t yet popular. American public and school libraries play a huge role in preserving the breadth of American literature by collecting and sharing books that are excellent but may not be written by YouTubers with large bulit-in audiences.

Libraries improve the quality of discourse in their communities in ways that piracy simply does not. And if it weren’t for the broad but carefully curated collection practices of libraries, the world of American literature would look a lot like the world of American film: Instead of hundreds of books being published every week, there would be four or five.

2. Libraries buy books. Lots of them. And there are tens of thousands of libraries around the country. That is good for me and good for my book. (Like, the average library copy of The Fault in Our Stars might get checked out 100 times, or even a thousand, butsingle files of Looking for Alaska have been illegally downloaded more than 50,000 times.)

3. For the more than 100 million Americans without Internet access at home, libraries are the only free places to use the web to search for jobs or connect with family or buy t-shirts at dftba.com. I am very happy if my books can help add value to institutions that facilitate such important services. I do not feel the same way about BitTorrent.

4. And this is the most important: I believe that creators of books should have control over how their work is distributed. If, for instance, a musician doesn’t want her songs played during Rick Santorum rallies, then Rick Santorum should not be allowed to use them. I don’t want my books to be available for free download (unless you borrow an e-copy from a library, that is). I just don’t. It’s not because I’m a greedy bastard or want to keep my books from people who might otherwise read them. It’s because I believe books are valuable. Right now, on Amazon, my brand new hardcover book costs about $10, which represents 1.2 hours of work at the federal minimum wage. I believe books are worth 1.2 hours of work. 

One last thing: A lot of people compare the world of books with the world of music. I think this comparison is unfair. For one thing, CDs were overpriced before Napster. I really don’t believe that books—at least my books—are currently overpriced**. More importantly, most musicians have a secondary source of income: They can charge for live performances. Writers—or at least the vast majority of writers—can’t do this. The book is The Thing. The book is all we have to offer.

And in my opinion, libraries preserve the integrity and the value of the book in ways that piracy simply does not.

Based on how many of you have already seen Season 2 of Sherlock, I realize that most of you disagree with me. And I’m happy to acknowledge that I might be wrong. I welcome your thoughts and responses on these complicated questions.

* The whole argument that piracy is some kind of civil disobedience in response to unfair copyright laws is ridiculous and indicates to me that not enough people are reading Civil Disobedience, or even the wikipedia article about it.

** As pointed out by no less an authority than John Darnielle, CDs weren’t overpriced by many independent record labels. Also, I should add that many books—particularly literary fiction hardcovers published for adults—are overpriced, sometimes dramatically. I think this is a bad and discouraging trend, which is one of the (many) reasons why I like publishing my books the way I do: It’s still possible for a hardcover to cost less than $20, and if you adjust for inflation, it always should be.

firstbook
firstbook:

Our friends at Random House Children’s Books have generously agreed to donate one brand-new book for each new follower we gain on Tumblr, Facebook, and Twitter this week. Those books will go to thousands of schools and programs serving kids from low-income families across the country.
Please Re-blog!
To learn more about First Book, please visit: www.firstbook.org

firstbook:

Our friends at Random House Children’s Books have generously agreed to donate one brand-new book for each new follower we gain on TumblrFacebook, and Twitter this week. Those books will go to thousands of schools and programs serving kids from low-income families across the country.

Please Re-blog!

To learn more about First Book, please visit: www.firstbook.org

brooklynmutt
A few times during his presidency, Obama admitted, he had written a personal check or made a phone call on the writer’s behalf, believing that it was his only way to ensure a fast result. “It’s not something I should advertise, but it has happened,” he told [Saslow]. Many other times, he had forwarded letters to government agencies or Cabinet secretaries after attaching a standard, handwritten note that read: “Can you please take care of this?”

“Some of these letters you read and you say, ‘Gosh, I really want to help this person, and I may not have the tools to help them right now,’ ” the president said. “And then you start thinking about the fact that for every one person that wrote describing their story, there might be another hundred thousand going through the same thing. So there are times when I’m reading the letters and I feel pained that I can’t do more, faster, to make a difference in their lives.”
joshsternberg
Americans began to argue about how their Constitution should be interpreted from the very moment that the new government under that constitution commenced. Those arguments have persisted, sometimes with extraordinary vehemence, to the present day. Politicians, jurists, and ordinary citizens insist, at one extreme, that ours is a “living Constitution,” intended by the founders to be interpreted in light of constantly changing circumstances. At the other extreme, the Constitution is viewed as a straightforward legal text, to be interpreted according to the “plain meaning” of the words on the page, as understood by the people of the United States at the time it was drafted. One of my hopes in writing this book is that those who profess a self-confident certainty about either the “intent” of the framers or the “original meaning” of the words written on the Constitution’s four parchment papers will, as they confront the uncertainty and humility with which the framers approached their task, admit to a bit more uncertainty and humility in their own pronouncements about our nation’s fundamental charter.

Richard Beeman, in the preface to his book, “Plain, Honest Men: The Making of the American Constitution.”

I have a feeling I will be referencing this book quite a lot as I read it.

(via joshsternberg)

infoneer-pulse

infoneer-pulse:

Textbook pirates have struck again. Nearly three years after publishers shut down a large Web site devoted to illegally trading e-textbooks, a copycat site has sprung up—with its leaders arguing that it is operating overseas in a way that will make it more difficult to stop.

The new site, LibraryPirate, quietly started operating last year, but it began a public-relations blitz last week, sending letters to the editor to several news sites, including The Chronicle, in which it called on students to make digital scans of their printed textbooks and post them to the site for free online.

» via The Chronicle of Higher Education (Subscription may be required for some content)

girlwithalessonplan
girlwithalessonplan:

housingworksbookstore:

slacktory:

11 Ragetoon Editions of Classic Kids’ Books
A brilliant collection by Jed Stoneham. While my personal favorite is Strega Nona, I think Green Eggs and Ham is the crowdpleaser.

All this and more at Slacktory.com, a new internet comedy blog we endorse, especially when it writes about children’s books.

Me gusta on a train. BAHAHHAHAHHAHA!

girlwithalessonplan:

housingworksbookstore:

slacktory:

11 Ragetoon Editions of Classic Kids’ Books

A brilliant collection by Jed Stoneham. While my personal favorite is Strega Nona, I think Green Eggs and Ham is the crowdpleaser.

All this and more at Slacktory.com, a new internet comedy blog we endorse, especially when it writes about children’s books.

Me gusta on a train. BAHAHHAHAHHAHA!