joshsternberg

The two justices have been attending Federalist Society events for years. And it’s nothing that runs afoul of ethics rules. In fact, justices are exempt from the Code of Conduct that governs the actions of lower federal justices.

If they were, they arguably fell under code’s Canon 4C, which states, “A judge may attend fund-raising events of law-related and other organizations although the judge may not be a speaker, a guest of honor, or featured on the program of such an event.“

Nevertheless, the sheer proximity of Scalia and Thomas to two of the law firms in the case, as well as to a company with a massive financial interest, was enough to alarm ethics-in-government activists.

brooklynmutt

Jim Lehrer’s MacNeil / Lehrer Editorial Guidelines.

They are as follows:

Do nothing I cannot defend.
Cover, write, and present every story with the care I would want if the story were about me.
Assume there is at least one other side or version to every story.
Assume the viewer is as smart and as caring and as good a person as I am.
Assume the same about all people on whom I report.
Assume personal lives are a private matter until a legitimate turn in the story absolutely mandates otherwise.
Carefully separate opinion and analysis from straight news stories, and clearly label everything.
Do not use anonymous sources or blind quotes except on rare and monumental occasions.
No one should ever be allowed to attack another anonymously.
And finally, I am not in the entertainment business.

Jim Lehrer  (link to the news today)

(reposting our first ever Tumblr post. I think it is fitting ^TG)

futurejournalismproject
futurejournalismproject:

The Staging of a Photo-Op
While not iconic like the Situation Room photograph released by the White House that’s now being memed, images of Barack Obama at the lectern announcing the Osama Bin Laden mission got their fare share of play in newspapers, magazines and Web sites.
But those images are staged. Take it away Jason Reed:

As President Obama continued his nine-minute address in front of just one main network camera, the photographers were held outside the room by staff and asked to remain completely silent. Once Obama was off the air, we were escorted in front of that teleprompter and the President then re-enacted the walk-out and first 30 seconds of the statement for us.

As Poynter notes, this practice isn’t new. It apparently happens all the time and is something to consider as we decide whether what we’re looking at is documentary or agitprop.
Via Poynter’s Al Tompkins:

Other photographers who work at the White House told Poynter.org that since the Reagan era (and possibly before) it has been the standard operating procedure that during a live presidential address, still cameras are not allowed to photograph the actual event…
…But this practice of re-enacting a historic speech flies directly in the face of the National Press Photographers Association Code of Ethics, which includes this relevant passage: “Resist being manipulated by staged photo opportunities.”

Aside: About that meme? Personal fav. — Michael

futurejournalismproject:

The Staging of a Photo-Op

While not iconic like the Situation Room photograph released by the White House that’s now being memed, images of Barack Obama at the lectern announcing the Osama Bin Laden mission got their fare share of play in newspapers, magazines and Web sites.

But those images are staged. Take it away Jason Reed:

As President Obama continued his nine-minute address in front of just one main network camera, the photographers were held outside the room by staff and asked to remain completely silent. Once Obama was off the air, we were escorted in front of that teleprompter and the President then re-enacted the walk-out and first 30 seconds of the statement for us.

As Poynter notes, this practice isn’t new. It apparently happens all the time and is something to consider as we decide whether what we’re looking at is documentary or agitprop.

Via Poynter’s Al Tompkins:

Other photographers who work at the White House told Poynter.org that since the Reagan era (and possibly before) it has been the standard operating procedure that during a live presidential address, still cameras are not allowed to photograph the actual event…

…But this practice of re-enacting a historic speech flies directly in the face of the National Press Photographers Association Code of Ethics, which includes this relevant passage: “Resist being manipulated by staged photo opportunities.”

Aside: About that meme? Personal fav. — Michael