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Idiots Respond To NBC Pre-Empting Sunday Night Football

politicalprof:

kohenari:

NBC pre-empted the first quarter of tonight’s 49ers-Patriots game to show President Obama’s speech at the Newtown memorial for victims of the Sandy Hook shooting. As you might expect, many football fans didn’t take kindly to this.

I’m not posting any of the tweets here; if you haven’t seen them and have an interest in the names and faces of the dregs of humanity, you can go see for yourself how unabashed racism, love of guns, love of televised sports, and hatred of government all mix together.

It’s interesting to see how many of these people have already deleted their Twitter accounts; I suppose they’ll just stick to being racist morons offline from now on. Even more interesting, though, are the geniuses who have kept their accounts and are defending themselves: “Hey, I was just making a joke.” Or, “I always talk like this about everyone.” Or, “People take everything too seriously.” Or, “I’m on the news!”

Of course, if there weren’t a ton of racist morons out there, I’m not sure what I’d write about

Politicalprof: this is incredibly hard to read, but it is a real part of America …

inothernews:

From the New York Times:

In his 18 years at Pinckney Community High School, Jim Darga, the  principal, said, the homecoming queen had always been crowned at  halftime of the school’s football game. Never before, though, had she  had to be summoned from the team’s locker room. 
 And that was just the beginning of Brianna Amat’s big night. 
 If being named homecoming queen is a lifetime memory for a high school  student, so, too, is kicking a winning field goal. For Amat, 18, they  happened within an hour of each other. 
 On Friday, with Pinckney leading powerful Michigan rival Grand Blanc,  6-0, at the half, Amat, the first girl to play football for the school’s  varsity, was asked to return to the field. When she arrived, she was  told that her fellow students had voted her queen. When the tiara was  placed on her head, she was wearing not a dress, like the other girls in  the homecoming court, but her No. 12 uniform, pads and all. 
 A short while later, with five minutes to play in the third quarter,  Amat was called to the same field to attempt a 31-yard field goal. She  split the uprights. 
 The kick proved decisive as Pinckney held on for a 9-7 victory against a  Grand Blanc team that had come into the game ranked seventh in the  state in its division. It also earned Amat the nickname the Kicking  Queen. 

(Photo of Pinckney High School kicker Brianna Amat at practice by Stephen McGee / The New York Times)

inothernews:

From the New York Times:

In his 18 years at Pinckney Community High School, Jim Darga, the principal, said, the homecoming queen had always been crowned at halftime of the school’s football game. Never before, though, had she had to be summoned from the team’s locker room.

And that was just the beginning of Brianna Amat’s big night.

If being named homecoming queen is a lifetime memory for a high school student, so, too, is kicking a winning field goal. For Amat, 18, they happened within an hour of each other.

On Friday, with Pinckney leading powerful Michigan rival Grand Blanc, 6-0, at the half, Amat, the first girl to play football for the school’s varsity, was asked to return to the field. When she arrived, she was told that her fellow students had voted her queen. When the tiara was placed on her head, she was wearing not a dress, like the other girls in the homecoming court, but her No. 12 uniform, pads and all.

A short while later, with five minutes to play in the third quarter, Amat was called to the same field to attempt a 31-yard field goal. She split the uprights.

The kick proved decisive as Pinckney held on for a 9-7 victory against a Grand Blanc team that had come into the game ranked seventh in the state in its division. It also earned Amat the nickname the Kicking Queen.

(Photo of Pinckney High School kicker Brianna Amat at practice by Stephen McGee / The New York Times)

timelightbox:

“After traveling the world and witnessing the best and worst humans have to offer, nine Olympics, dozens of would-be presidents, the poorest and the most powerful among us, I’m back in Nebraska and halfway through shooting my dream project” - Kenneth Jarecke. As the Cornhuskers play their first Big Ten conference game Saturday, a new book by Kenneth Jarecke chronicles the team’s 2010 season. See more here.

timelightbox:

“After traveling the world and witnessing the best and worst humans have to offer, nine Olympics, dozens of would-be presidents, the poorest and the most powerful among us, I’m back in Nebraska and halfway through shooting my dream project” - Kenneth Jarecke. As the Cornhuskers play their first Big Ten conference game Saturday, a new book by Kenneth Jarecke chronicles the team’s 2010 season. See more here.

thedailyfeed:

With bin Laden out of the way, the BCS is next on the government’s hit list. Think we’re kidding?

Consider this: Attorney General Eric Holder referenced both bin Laden and college football’s Bowl Championship Series when he testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill yesterday. 
First, Holder explained  that Sunday’s raid on the Al Qaeda kingpin’s hideout was a “kill-or-capture mission” and then implied the BCS was next up in the crosshairs. Responding to a remark from Senator Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) in which he called the BCS a “mess”, Holder replied, “I don’t disagree with you.
“You and I have talked about this issue,” the attorney general said, “and I think I’m free to say that we have sent a letter to the NCAA about this issue and will be following up.”

John Walters has the story.

thedailyfeed:

With bin Laden out of the way, the BCS is next on the government’s hit list. Think we’re kidding?

Consider this: Attorney General Eric Holder referenced both bin Laden and college football’s Bowl Championship Series when he testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill yesterday. 

First, Holder explained  that Sunday’s raid on the Al Qaeda kingpin’s hideout was a “kill-or-capture mission” and then implied the BCS was next up in the crosshairs. Responding to a remark from Senator Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) in which he called the BCS a “mess”, Holder replied, “I don’t disagree with you.

“You and I have talked about this issue,” the attorney general said, “and I think I’m free to say that we have sent a letter to the NCAA about this issue and will be following up.”

John Walters has the story.

(Source: thedailyfeed)

CBS and ESPN requested the tape Tuesday. It might even be on CBS’ “College Football Today” Saturday.

[…]The video, shot by Tyler Rutherford of the Iowa State athletic department, shows players jumping and hollering with jubilation after they ended a 15-game losing streak in Lincoln.

The players become somewhat calm until quarterback Austen Arnaud yells, “We love you, defense,” and that sets off another round of celebration and singing of the school song.

This is where Rhoads becomes more involved.

"I couldn’t be prouder," he says, voice trying to project over singing players. "I couldn’t be prouder. I am so proud. … I am so proud to be your coach."

There’s chanting until Rhoads asks for the floor:

"Listen to me," he bellows. "Listen to me. I am so proud to be your coach."

There’s more celebration, this time including Rhoads jumping with his players like victorious baseball players at home plate after a winning home run.

ISU football: Coach Paul Rhoads’ jubilation after beating Nebraska becomes a hit online | desmoinesregister.com | The Des Moines Register

If you’re at all familiar with Iowa State Football, you can understand why this win is such a big deal for the Cyclones. Just a hint, this was the first win for Iowa State in Lincoln (1977) since before I was born (1980).

Coach Rhoads’ got passion, that you can’t argue.

apologies to Al

inothernews:
GOOD HEAD Baltimore Ravens wide receiver Derrick Mason (foreground) lands on his head after catching a touchdown pass as New England Patriots safety Brandon Meriweather looks on.  The Patriots won, 27-21.  (Photo: AP via the Telegraph)
Someone who knows football better than me…
This is obviously a TD because no matter where he falls, he’s in the endzone…but
if this had occurred at the sideline…same picture as above except the sideline is right behind him and he falls on his back out of bounds with his head being the only part of his body that touches the endzone turf, will that be ruled a TD?
In other words, the receiver’s feet never touched the turf while in possession of the ball…
I’m thinking of the rule that requires NFL receivers to get both feet in the field of play (one foot in NCAA if I recall) before being pushed out or falling out of bounds
A forward pass is complete when a receiver clearly possesses the pass and touches the ground with both feet inbounds while in possession of the ball. If a receiver would have landed inbounds with both feet but is carried or pushed out of bounds while maintaining possession of the ball, pass is complete at the out-of-bounds spot.
NFL Rulebook: Forward Pass Rules

inothernews:

GOOD HEAD Baltimore Ravens wide receiver Derrick Mason (foreground) lands on his head after catching a touchdown pass as New England Patriots safety Brandon Meriweather looks on.  The Patriots won, 27-21.  (Photo: AP via the Telegraph)

Someone who knows football better than me…

This is obviously a TD because no matter where he falls, he’s in the endzone…but

if this had occurred at the sideline…same picture as above except the sideline is right behind him and he falls on his back out of bounds with his head being the only part of his body that touches the endzone turf, will that be ruled a TD?

In other words, the receiver’s feet never touched the turf while in possession of the ball…

I’m thinking of the rule that requires NFL receivers to get both feet in the field of play (one foot in NCAA if I recall) before being pushed out or falling out of bounds

A forward pass is complete when a receiver clearly possesses the pass and touches the ground with both feet inbounds while in possession of the ball. If a receiver would have landed inbounds with both feet but is carried or pushed out of bounds while maintaining possession of the ball, pass is complete at the out-of-bounds spot.

NFL Rulebook: Forward Pass Rules