politicalprof

politicalprof:

kohenari:

NBC pre-empted the first quarter of tonight’s 49ers-Patriots game to show President Obama’s speech at the Newtown memorial for victims of the Sandy Hook shooting. As you might expect, many football fans didn’t take kindly to this.

I’m not posting any of the tweets here; if you haven’t seen them and have an interest in the names and faces of the dregs of humanity, you can go see for yourself how unabashed racism, love of guns, love of televised sports, and hatred of government all mix together.

It’s interesting to see how many of these people have already deleted their Twitter accounts; I suppose they’ll just stick to being racist morons offline from now on. Even more interesting, though, are the geniuses who have kept their accounts and are defending themselves: “Hey, I was just making a joke.” Or, “I always talk like this about everyone.” Or, “People take everything too seriously.” Or, “I’m on the news!”

Of course, if there weren’t a ton of racist morons out there, I’m not sure what I’d write about

Politicalprof: this is incredibly hard to read, but it is a real part of America …

kohenari
kohenari:

Literally minutes after the Fox Nation website announced that President Obama’s reelection led directly to massive lay-offs “across America,” Republican citizens who bafflingly continue to believe what Fox News tells them took to Facebook to discuss the mythical lay-offs and to argue that companies should fire Democrats first.
The comment thread actually got far more absurd after I took this screenshot. Here are some choice nuggets:

Choosing to buy from a “Red” company rather than a “Blue” one, all else being equal, or even maybe a little unequal, is something else altogether. I don’t propose we unilaterally disarm ourselves.
But if it’s really happening, it’s worth educating America with the reality of it. Majority voted for this, yet here they thought utopia was on its way. Leftism in power brings out the worst in human nature, neither side is exempt from it.
Is someone saying they’re laying off Dem employees instead of Rep employees? Wow. Talk about the un-anticipated and unintended consequences (by those who elected Obama) of destroying freedom in a single election. Trickle-down paybacks. Which turns into more paybacks. As intended and orchestrated by the left, class warfare on the ground begins. What a devastating time for our nation. And it’s only been 3 days.
Lord knows, the Left rigs the hiring and publishing game in academia, media.
Well actually, I’ve heard that anyone in Hollywood who votes conservative, is really attacked

Here’s how the thread came to a grinding halt:

And … no further comments after that.
At what point do we imagine that a majority of Republicans will start to realize that Fox News is actively lying to them?

kohenari:

Literally minutes after the Fox Nation website announced that President Obama’s reelection led directly to massive lay-offs “across America,” Republican citizens who bafflingly continue to believe what Fox News tells them took to Facebook to discuss the mythical lay-offs and to argue that companies should fire Democrats first.

The comment thread actually got far more absurd after I took this screenshot. Here are some choice nuggets:

  • Choosing to buy from a “Red” company rather than a “Blue” one, all else being equal, or even maybe a little unequal, is something else altogether. I don’t propose we unilaterally disarm ourselves.
  • But if it’s really happening, it’s worth educating America with the reality of it. Majority voted for this, yet here they thought utopia was on its way. Leftism in power brings out the worst in human nature, neither side is exempt from it.
  • Is someone saying they’re laying off Dem employees instead of Rep employees? Wow. Talk about the un-anticipated and unintended consequences (by those who elected Obama) of destroying freedom in a single election. Trickle-down paybacks. Which turns into more paybacks. As intended and orchestrated by the left, class warfare on the ground begins. What a devastating time for our nation. And it’s only been 3 days.
  • Lord knows, the Left rigs the hiring and publishing game in academia, media.
  • Well actually, I’ve heard that anyone in Hollywood who votes conservative, is really attacked

Here’s how the thread came to a grinding halt:

image

And … no further comments after that.

At what point do we imagine that a majority of Republicans will start to realize that Fox News is actively lying to them?

kohenari

Sweet, Sweet Nectar

kohenari:

In response to my post about the Confederate States of America going for Romney, some Romney/Ryan Tumblr bloggers rushed in to point out how offended they are and how there’s no such thing as racism anymore.

First there was this one, short and to-the-point:

Nothing but a race baiter…

Then this one:

wow, this person does realize that the confederate states existed a long time ago right? they’re long gone. stupid liberals and their race-baiting, i can’t stand it.

Then this one:

Maybe because the CSA actually had to do with traditionalism, a booming economy, citizen’s rights, and state’s rights?

And then this one:

Anybody want to mention the fact that the Confederacy was made up of Democrats. History people, learn it.

And then almost certainly the best possible one:

I support the CSA (I don’t think the main issue was slavery btw) I feel like it was a good thing that our founding fathers would have supported. I think democrats have changed a lot, they were decent for a long time then something happened and they all became a bunch of commies

Until I saw this one:

Don’t forget the KKK was started by the Democrats. They went after black and white Republicans to start.

So thank you, my GOP friends; you’ve made my point so much more eloquently than I ever could have done.

truth-has-a-liberal-bias
truth-has-a-liberal-bias:

ARE THEY READING WHAT WE BLOG?
~~~
They are just relentless. Corporations and government agencies are trying to use their influence to get carte-blanche access to our private data. And if we let CISPA — the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act — become law, that’s exactly what they’ll get — nearly complete access to everything we do online. Urge your senators to vote NO on CISPA and any other legislation that would let the military collect our private internet records. CISPA already passed the House. But if we don’t take a stand in the Senate, companies could soon have access to share our sensitive and private information with military agencies, including the National Security Agency. CISPA effectively allows them to gain access to our personal information without a warrant, without oversight, and without limits, and the Senate may soon vote on proposals that go just as far.Those are rules we can’t live by. We deserve better privacy laws. And we demand a better bill than CISPA. We need to make our voices heard: Tell your senators that you oppose any legislation that would allow the military to use personal information to spy on Americans.
Thanks for taking action,
Laura W. MurphyDirector, ACLU Washington Office

truth-has-a-liberal-bias:

ARE THEY READING WHAT WE BLOG?

~~~

They are just relentless.

Corporations and government agencies are trying to use their influence to get carte-blanche access to our private data.

And if we let CISPA — the Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act — become law, that’s exactly what they’ll get — nearly complete access to everything we do online.

Urge your senators to vote NO on CISPA and any other legislation that would let the military collect our private internet records.

CISPA already passed the House. But if we don’t take a stand in the Senate, companies could soon have access to share our sensitive and private information with military agencies, including the National Security Agency.

CISPA effectively allows them to gain access to our personal information without a warrant, without oversight, and without limits, and the Senate may soon vote on proposals that go just as far.

Those are rules we can’t live by. We deserve better privacy laws. And we demand a better bill than CISPA.

We need to make our voices heard: Tell your senators that you oppose any legislation that would allow the military to use personal information to spy on Americans.

Thanks for taking action,

Laura W. Murphy
Director, ACLU Washington Office

kohenari

kohenari:

It seems that racist fans of The Hunger Games are also very bad at reading comprehension, expressing their outrage via Twitter over the fact that two characters — who are both described as having “dark brown skin” in the book — were portrayed by black actors in the film.

I read some of the tweets last night (Jamelle Bouie retweeted a bunch of them and there’s a Tumblr blog dedicated to finding and publishing them); they made my stomach churn. Prior to seeing these tweets, I didn’t have anything at all to say about The Hunger Games: I haven’t read the books, I haven’t seen the movie, and doing either of these things isn’t at the top of my list.

But, of course, now I have a comment:

In all honesty, I’m not at all surprised by the sentiment, as I have a pretty good idea that we’re not living in the post-racial paradise of (some of) our dreams and, as an educator, I know that reading comprehension is sorely lacking in this country.

But I really am shocked that people want to tweet their racism and stupidity out to the universe. I continue to long for the day when racist idiots keep their idiocy to themselves as I really believe that’s the first step in doing away with the idiocy altogether. As the philosopher Richard Rorty once wrote, “what people cannot say in public becomes, eventually, what they cannot say even in private, and then, still later, what they cannot even believe in their hearts.”[1]

Apparently, we’ve still got a very long way to go even to get to that point.

[1] Richard Rorty, “What Can You Expect From Anti-Foundationalist Philosophers?: A Reply to Lynn Baker,” 78 Virginia Law Review (April 1992), 725-726.

kohenari

The Problem of Online Anonymity

kohenari:

In principle, I don’t have any problem at all with people who write anonymously or pseudonymously. But in practice I find it incredibly troubling.

It’s clear that, for some, this is really the only way to express oneself or to publish critical points of view. There are bloggers who have a credible fear of persecution based on identity, religious belief, or political opinion. For them, the ability to publish anonymously is incredibly important. And it’s important for us too, as we wouldn’t be able to hear their voices otherwise. That’s why I allow anonymous comments and questions on my blog.

But when people write anonymously or pseudonymously online, they must recognize that they face a real challenge.

In our daily lives, we filter the things we say for all sorts of reasons: We don’t want to hurt someone else’s feelings; we don’t want people to think badly of us; we feel, deep down, that some words are out of bounds. But online, we seem to feel sometimes like we don’t need to do that filtering … especially if no one knows who we are.

There’s something freeing, to be sure, about being able to say anything you want. You can engage in unfounded name-calling, or intentionally hurt someone’s feelings, or just generally behave like a twelve year old. And no one will know it’s you.

And that’s why I don’t read many blogs that are written by people who prefer to remain anonymous or who write under pseudonyms when there isn’t really any reason for them to do so. In fact, I don’t think there are any blogs I read on a daily basis whose authors are anonymous. The anonymous or pseudonymous blogs are often just filled with cruelty, name-calling, and bad arguments. Indeed, there are a great many people who choose to write under an assumed name because they want to harass or offend others. These people would never say these things to someone else’s face because they know and fear the consequences; instead, they hide behind their anonymity to do it (hoping, I guess, that their IP address is somehow being hidden, though it generally is not). This is cowardice, plain and simple.

It’s also why I write under my own name. First of all, it’s a privilege to be free to publish my opinions and arguments with my name on them. But also, it’s helpful to me to keep in mind that my name is going to be attached to the things that I put online for others to read. This often leads me to spend more time on my posts or comments rather than simply dashing them off and moving on to the next thing. It’s why I try to write out arguments rather than simply quoting someone and writing “LOL” or “This is stupid.” And, finally, it’s why I try to get to know the people who repeatedly take the time to comment on my blog in thoughtful ways, even if they do so anonymously. Occasionally, these people choose to remain anonymous, but most of the time we continue our conversations on Facebook, Twitter, or Google+ (where they write under their own names).

There’s certainly something important about the option of anonymity so you’ll never read an argument entirely against it from me. But it can also be a weapon and the people who use it to bully others are threatening to silence those who require anonymity in order to speak at all by encouraging the rest of us to generally ignore anonymous or pseudonymous authors.

inothernews

inothernews:

No opt-out.

randomactsofchaos
Really? ‘Nerds’? You know, actually, I think the word you’re looking for is ‘experts,’ to enlighten you so your laws won’t backfire and break the Internet.

JON STEWART, on members of Congress considering the SOPA and PIPA bills exasperatedly calling for “nerds” to help them understand SOPA and PIPA, on The Daily Show.

Why does Congress bother convening at all?

(via inothernews)