girlwithalessonplan

This Isn’t the Petition Response You’re Looking For

girlwithalessonplan:

kohenari:

The Obama Administration finally took some time away from less important matters and responded to the people’s call for the creation of a Death Star:

The official White House response to a petition to secure resources and funding, and begin construction of a Death Star by 2016:

By Paul Shawcross

The Administration shares your desire for job creation and a strong national defense, but a Death Star isn’t on the horizon. Here are a few reasons:

  • The construction of the Death Star has been estimated to cost more than $850,000,000,000,000,000. We’re working hard to reduce the deficit, not expand it.
  • The Administration does not support blowing up planets.
  • Why would we spend countless taxpayer dollars on a Death Star with a fundamental flaw that can be exploited by a one-man starship?

However, look carefully (here’s how) and you’ll notice something already floating in the sky—that’s no Moon, it’s a Space Station! Yes, we already have a giant, football field-sized International Space Station in orbit around the Earth that’s helping us learn how humans can live and thrive in space for long durations. The Space Station has six astronauts—American, Russian, and Canadian—living in it right now, conducting research, learning how to live and work in space over long periods of time, routinely welcoming visiting spacecraft and repairing onboard garbage mashers, etc. We’ve also got two robot science labs—one wielding a laser—roving around Mars, looking at whether life ever existed on the Red Planet.

Keep in mind, space is no longer just government-only. Private American companies, through NASA’s Commercial Crew and Cargo Program Office (C3PO), are ferrying cargo—and soon, crew—to space for NASA, and are pursuing human missions to the Moon this decade.

Even though the United States doesn’t have anything that can do the Kessel Run in less than 12 parsecs, we’ve got two spacecraft leaving the Solar System and we’re building a probe that will fly to the exterior layers of the Sun. We are discovering hundreds of new planets in other star systems and building a much more powerful successor to the Hubble Space Telescope that will see back to the early days of the universe.

We don’t have a Death Star, but we do have floating robot assistants on the Space Station, a President who knows his way around a light saber and advanced (marshmallow) cannon, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, which is supporting research on building Luke’s arm, floating droids, and quadruped walkers.

We are living in the future! Enjoy it. Or better yet, help build it by pursuing a career in a science, technology, engineering or math-related field. The President has held the first-ever White House science fairs and Astronomy Night on the South Lawn because he knows these domains are critical to our country’s future, and to ensuring the United States continues leading the world in doing big things.

If you do pursue a career in a science, technology, engineering or math-related field, the Force will be with us! Remember, the Death Star’s power to destroy a planet, or even a whole star system, is insignificant next to the power of the Force.

Paul Shawcross is Chief of the Science and Space Branch at the White House Office of Management and Budget

Since this is unquestionably the best response to any petition we can ever hope to receive, can we all agree to stop using that online petition website now?

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kohenari
kohenari:

I’m just going to put this here so I’m on record because I refuse to go along with all of the negativity that immediately hit the internet when rumors started flying a few minutes ago about a new Star Wars film.
If there is one, I’ll be in line to see it on opening night. I love the story and I love the universe in which it takes place and, even though I don’t love the choices that George Lucas has made, I’m still an enormous fan and I’m sure I always will be.
So, everyone out there can fill their Twitter and Facebook feeds with snark and a self-satisfied ironic detachment about Star Wars and its myriad problems … but if you’re ten years older than me or five years younger than me, I know I’ll see you in line for Episode VII.

kohenari:

I’m just going to put this here so I’m on record because I refuse to go along with all of the negativity that immediately hit the internet when rumors started flying a few minutes ago about a new Star Wars film.

If there is one, I’ll be in line to see it on opening night. I love the story and I love the universe in which it takes place and, even though I don’t love the choices that George Lucas has made, I’m still an enormous fan and I’m sure I always will be.

So, everyone out there can fill their Twitter and Facebook feeds with snark and a self-satisfied ironic detachment about Star Wars and its myriad problems … but if you’re ten years older than me or five years younger than me, I know I’ll see you in line for Episode VII.

danhacker

danhacker:

‘Star Wars’ 80’s High School Redesign Concepts | Denis Medri

Artist Denis Medri has been pumping out a steady stream of redesigns of classic comic characters, and given them the Steampunk treatment, Western treatment and even Rockabilly treatment. However recent pieces that turn Star Wars into an 80’s High School movie might just be his most imaginative creations yet. He’s able to take non-human characters and make them human, while not losing the true visual elements about what makes them so unique. Preppy Lando might just be one of the most perfect things the internet has ever thought forth. Brilliant stuff going on here.

So…Luke is Marty McFly…interesting.

kohenari
kohenari:

Creepy Mark Hamill is very, very creepy.
Honestly, I understand that Hamill is an actor and that, as an actor, he wants to work and, if possible, to challenge himself. But my nine-year-old self really, really wishes that George Lucas had just paid Hamill a modest annual stipend to stay home most days and to dress up like Luke Skywalker at a handful of annual events.

kohenari:

Creepy Mark Hamill is very, very creepy.

Honestly, I understand that Hamill is an actor and that, as an actor, he wants to work and, if possible, to challenge himself. But my nine-year-old self really, really wishes that George Lucas had just paid Hamill a modest annual stipend to stay home most days and to dress up like Luke Skywalker at a handful of annual events.

annaverity

annaetc:

My name is Anna, and I completely agree with Richard Lawson’s review of Brave.

(Some spoilers below.)

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At no point does Lawson say that the movie is missing a depiction of maleness or male relationships. Instead, he make the (valid) argument that of the infinite the story lines available, Pixar chose one of the flattest, easiest, and most conventionally feminine, one that Lawson rightly summarizes as, “She’s just a girl who doesn’t want to get married? She’s a girl who rejects girl things and is thus a hero? (Because girl things are silly, whereas swords and arrows are totally cool, period.)” And oh, by the way, she doesn’t get along with her mother and turns her into a beast—teenage girls, amiright?

There is no larger theme of mortality (Toy Story), loss and grief (Up), humanity (Wall•E). There isn’t even anything all that new about Pixar’s take on mother-daughter relationships: they fight, Merida runs away from home, uses magic to punish her mother, instantly regrets this, and comes around when she’s forcefully reminded that she’s still just a girl who needs to be protected from the scary, wild world.

Beyond that, I was uncomfortable during the scenes with Merida and her mother-as-bear, because though I knew the point was to laugh (and to marvel at the truly impressive animation), I realized later that I don’t need yet another opportunity to find humor in the literal dehumanization of a woman, and I don’t need yet another example of a woman who is supposedly better off for having been forcibly changed.

To date, Pixar has released thirteen movies. Its first twelve featured male protagonists, a problem in and of itself, which is why Brave was so damn exciting. (I teared up every time I saw a preview because…Brave!) But ultimately, what sets Brave apart from those first twelve movies is not that its protagonist happens to be a girl, but that its protagonist must be a girl. Woody, Carl, Wall-E, and the rest: the gender of these characters could be swapped without significantly changing the stories and themes of their movies, but Merida must be female, because only women are expected to choose between rejecting traditional gender roles and keeping the kingdom safe, and it breaks my heart that this is the only story Pixar could think to tell about a teenage girl.

TL;DR: Where’s my “Define Dancing” moment of Pixar magic? The closest Brave gets is that one brief but beautiful scene in which Merida takes a day off from being a princess and rides through the woods, practicing archery and eventually climbing the falls, looking for just a minute like everything I’d hoped she and her movie would be.

I enjoyed the movie, and more so its music, but I also wasn’t captivated by it like I was the Toy Story movies, Up, Incredibles, Ratatouille, and Wall-E. I agree with the common criticism of the movie, many of the story beats felt typical Disney, and not a good way but in the it has been done a dozen times sort of way. 

The following quote from above is an excellent point and not one I thought about until I read it.

"I don’t need yet another opportunity to find humor in the literal dehumanization of a woman, and I don’t need yet another example of a woman who is supposedly better off for having been forcibly changed."

kohenari

kohenari:

It seems that racist fans of The Hunger Games are also very bad at reading comprehension, expressing their outrage via Twitter over the fact that two characters — who are both described as having “dark brown skin” in the book — were portrayed by black actors in the film.

I read some of the tweets last night (Jamelle Bouie retweeted a bunch of them and there’s a Tumblr blog dedicated to finding and publishing them); they made my stomach churn. Prior to seeing these tweets, I didn’t have anything at all to say about The Hunger Games: I haven’t read the books, I haven’t seen the movie, and doing either of these things isn’t at the top of my list.

But, of course, now I have a comment:

In all honesty, I’m not at all surprised by the sentiment, as I have a pretty good idea that we’re not living in the post-racial paradise of (some of) our dreams and, as an educator, I know that reading comprehension is sorely lacking in this country.

But I really am shocked that people want to tweet their racism and stupidity out to the universe. I continue to long for the day when racist idiots keep their idiocy to themselves as I really believe that’s the first step in doing away with the idiocy altogether. As the philosopher Richard Rorty once wrote, “what people cannot say in public becomes, eventually, what they cannot say even in private, and then, still later, what they cannot even believe in their hearts.”[1]

Apparently, we’ve still got a very long way to go even to get to that point.

[1] Richard Rorty, “What Can You Expect From Anti-Foundationalist Philosophers?: A Reply to Lynn Baker,” 78 Virginia Law Review (April 1992), 725-726.

truth-has-a-liberal-bias

truth-has-a-liberal-bias:

As Marty McFly, he took us Back to the Future. Now, through his work leading The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research (MJFF), actor and activist Michael J. Fox is helping to usher in a new future for people with Parkinson’s disease (PD)—one filled with hope.

“I know without fail that we are getting closer—day by day, year by year—to the breakthroughs that will make finding a cure inevitable,” Fox tells Neurology Now. “A lot of work lies ahead of us. But this is a responsibility we have, and we want people to know someone is trying to get this work done.”

……

The Canadian-born Fox, now 50, became a household name worldwide in the early 1980s, starring as the endearing preppy Alex P. Keaton on the smash TV series Family Ties.

….

Success on the small screen paved the way for movie stardom, and in 1985 Fox turned in one of the most iconic and beloved performances of modern movie history: Back to the Future’s Marty McFly, an ’80s teen who experiences serious culture shock when he travels back in time to the poodle-skirts and soda shops of his parents’ adolescence in the ’50s. The Steven Spielberg–produced film was an extraordinary success, both critically and commercially, and spawned two sequels.

….

Then in 1991, while filming Doc Hollywood (in which he played, ironically, a doctor), Fox began to experience strange physical sensations. Later that year, when he was 30 years old, he was diagnosed with young-onset (Parkinson’s disease).

….

Fox stepped down from full-time acting in 2000. At the time, he’d been starring as Mike Flaherty, Deputy Mayor of New York City, on the TV show Spin City—a role he’d been playing since 1996 and for which he had earned another three Golden Globe awards and another Emmy.

…..

Less than a year after Fox stepped down from full-time acting, MJFF (The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research) was born.

“It’s ironic that I had to quit my day job to do my life’s work,” Fox says. “I’ve been fortunate to have had not just one, but two careers that I’m passionate about.

And I’m convinced that I couldn’t have had one without the other. Television plucked me from obscurity and, in many ways, helped prepare me for challenges and opportunities that I never saw coming but that were the greatest of my life.” […]

girlwithalessonplan
23 years. We finished it, financed it myself, and I figured, you know, I could get prints and ads paid for by the studios, and that they would release it. I showed it to all of them and they said ‘No. we don’t know how to market a movie like this.’ …It’s because it’s an all-black movie. There’s no major white roles in it at all. It’s one of the first all-black action pictures ever made.

Red Tails executive producer GEORGE LUCAS, on why it took more than two decades for his latest film to hit movie theatres, on The Daily Show.

For shame, Hollywood.

(via inothernews)

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I love, love, love movies, but there is a lot about Hollywood business that infuriates me.

Really, Hollywood?  3 BIG MAMA’S HOUSE MOVIES ARE OKAY BUT NOT THIS?

(via girlwithalessonplan)

existentialcrisisfactory

To summarize, Eddie Murphy grossing oodles of money as a successful director, producer, writer, and actor in films featuring him as a doctor, a veterinarian, a dedicated father, and the voice of a beloved donkey in the second highest-grossing animated film of all time is considered some sort of failure, but playing a jive talking felon is redemption. Huh?

There are many ways to interpret this — that Hollywood and movie critics (and many in society) are more comfortable with black actors playing damaging, stereotypical roles involving criminality, violence, and deviance (remember back in 2002 when Denzel Washington finally won the Oscar for playing a crooked cop?); that male actors are failures if they appear in family-friendly movies, regardless of how economically successful these movies may be; that to be considered successful, male actors have to appear in movies geared towards male audiences.

Alan Rickman as the Sheriff of Nottingham
Back when I first heard that Alan Rickman had been cast as Severus Snape in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s/Philosopher’s Stone, I pictured Snape looking similar in appearance to Rickman portraying the Sheriff of Nottingham in Robin Hood Prince of Thieves.
The Snape in the Harry Potter Movies was a good physical interpretation, but I have always been a little disappointed that he didn’t look more like the Sheriff.

Alan Rickman as the Sheriff of Nottingham

Back when I first heard that Alan Rickman had been cast as Severus Snape in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s/Philosopher’s Stone, I pictured Snape looking similar in appearance to Rickman portraying the Sheriff of Nottingham in Robin Hood Prince of Thieves.

The Snape in the Harry Potter Movies was a good physical interpretation, but I have always been a little disappointed that he didn’t look more like the Sheriff.