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On Populism

politicalprof:

Populism is afoot in the land.

Populism, taken simply, is a political ideology grounded in the belief that some elite somewhere runs things for their own good, inevitably screwing the deserving groups of society. Populist movements occur when groups of people band together seeking to overthrow this elite in the name of the “people.”

But it turns out the story is more complicated than that. Populism comes in at least two varieties: left-wing populism and right-wing populism. They share important features in common, but differ in politically significant ways.

Left-wing populists believe that society is unjustly run by an elite of corporate and wealthy persons in cooperation with their enablers in government. This cabal of “bad guys” systematically screws over the mass of people—poor, working and middle class people just trying to make a living, build good lives through access to things like public schools and affordable higher education, and enjoy the fruits of labor over the whole course of their lives.

Sound familiar? It should: I’ve just summarized the populist part of the Occupy movement.

Right-wing populism shares a skepticism of government with left-wing populism, but holds a very different group of people accountable for society’s ills. In right-wing populism, the bad guys are society’s unproductive, undeserving groups (the poor, public employees, and others who live on the public dole) along with their enablers in government. This cabal of bad people works to take money from deserving, productive people (the employed and yes, even corporations and the wealthy) to give it to people who have demonstrated their failure as people in the fact of their needing or asking for help.

Welcome to tea party America.

So it turns out that leftists and rightists share a lot in common in American politics. They both sense the good people of society are being screwed over by the bad people of society. They just define each group differently.

Need final proof? Check out the picture at the bottom of this post: it is a mashup of signs from tea party rallies and anarchist rallies against the G-20 and globalization.They say politics makes strange bedlfellows … and this time, they’re right.

picture

I didn’t cause this fucking deficit, old people who got sick didn’t cause this deficit, hungry children whose homes were foreclosed on illegally didn’t cause this fucking crisis, your damned war profiteering did, tax cuts for the super rich did, corporate welfare did.

I didn’t wreck the economy, the fucking bankers did.

[…]

You know who fucked this up? The very, very rich people! The politicians who are OWNED by very, very rich people. You fucked this up, not me, so you need to go first on the “Let’s sacrifice” diving board, because I am not in any position to sacrifice and you, dear rich people, have ALL THE FUCKING MONEY.

diegueno:


He said Watts, of Philadelphia, Pa., put together his tent a day after Jesse Jackson helped protect a medical tent from being dismantled on Oct. 17.
“A [police] captain told him to take it down,” the protester said. “[Watts] said, ‘No.’ He faced the cops down. After that, tents started popping up everywhere. That kid was a fighter.”
Soon after protesters started pitching tents, a gal pal of Watts’ told the New York Times Magazine he lost his virginity at the encampment.
“Brandon lost his virginity today — not to me,” Core Jones, 20, told the magazine on Oct. 23. “I don’t know who the girl is. But I want to have a party for him.”

(via Protester Brandon Watts, who was first to pitch a tent at Zuccotti Park, is now the bloody face of ‘Day of Action’ - NY Daily News)

diegueno:

He said Watts, of Philadelphia, Pa., put together his tent a day after Jesse Jackson helped protect a medical tent from being dismantled on Oct. 17.

“A [police] captain told him to take it down,” the protester said. “[Watts] said, ‘No.’ He faced the cops down. After that, tents started popping up everywhere. That kid was a fighter.”

Soon after protesters started pitching tents, a gal pal of Watts’ told the New York Times Magazine he lost his virginity at the encampment.

“Brandon lost his virginity today — not to me,” Core Jones, 20, told the magazine on Oct. 23. “I don’t know who the girl is. But I want to have a party for him.”


(Source: tweetdeck.com)

One of the appalling things here is that there are so many Democratic mayors involved in these crackdowns or in Bloomberg’s case, someone who is seen as a liberal,” Ehrenreich said in a telephone interview. “And where in all this was Obama? Why couldn’t he have picked up the phone at some point a couple of weeks ago and called the mayors of Portland and Oakland and said: ‘go easy on these people. They represent the anger and aspirations of the majority’. Would that have been so difficult?

Where is Lori Saldaña, Susan Davis or Bob Filner for Occupy San Diego? It looks like Filner doesn’t even recognize himself in Occupiers.

They don’t seem to have any more guts than the City Council has.

(via diegueno)

(via diegueno)

kileyrae:

believeinmyths:

thedailywhat:

Police State Photo of the Day: In this striking photo by longtime Oregonian staff photographer Randy L. Rasmussen, an Occupy Portland protester gets a faceful of Mace during yesterday’s local Day of Action demonstration at Pioneer Courthouse Square.
Compare With: Joshua Trujillo’s now-iconic photo of 84-year-old Seattleite Dorli Rainey following a similar encounter with the nozzle end of a pepper spray can.
[oregonian.]

“Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.” - John F. Kennedy
“I object to violence because when it appears to do good, the good is only temporary; the evil it does is permanent.” - Mohandas Gandhi
“He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt. He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice. This disgrace to civilization should be done away with at once. Heroism at command, senseless brutality, deplorable love-of-country stance, how violently I hate all this, how despicable and ignoble war is; I would rather be torn to shreds than be a part of so base an action! It is my conviction that killing under the cloak of war is nothing but an act of murder” - Albert Einstein
“It is easier to lead men to combat, stirring up their passion, than to restrain them and direct them toward the patient labours of peace.” - Andre Gide
“I like to believe that people in the long run are going to do more to promote peace than our governments. Indeed, I think that people want peace so much that, one of these days, governments had better get out of the way and let them have it.” - Dwight D. Eisenhower 
“Peace cannot be achieved through violence, it can only be attained through understanding.” - Ralph Waldo Emerson
“Nonviolence is the answer to the crucial political and moral questions of our time; the need for mankind to overcome oppression and violence without resorting to oppression and violence. Mankind must evolve for all human conflict a method which rejects revenge, aggression, and retaliation. The foundation of such a method is love.” - Martin Luther King Jr.
“Peace and friendship with all mankind is our wisest policy, and I wish we may be permitted to pursue it.” - Thomas Jefferson
If everyone demanded peace instead of another television set, then there’d be peace.” - John Lennon
I don’t give an everliving fuck if you support Occupy Wall Street or not. The police have a duty, and that duty is to protect and keep things peaceful. That is their job, because them, these people do not have jobs. They should not be creating violence, they should be preventing it. I don’t care if a person was yelling and chanting, a policeman’s first reaction should not be to mace someone, it should be to calm them down in an appropriate manner.
I try to defend police officers, because I, unlike many others, understand that there are genuinely good people in the career that want to serve and protect. But when multiple individuals violate that, it just proves the stereotype that there are people who take advantage of that job and are just downright pigs. 
I will not ever be able to understand hurting someone. Ever. This image is powerful, though. The peace sign of the person in contrast to the individual getting maced makes it makes me question who in their right mind against the movement can look at such a picture and not question their moral standing.

^ This. This. THIS.

kileyrae:

believeinmyths:

thedailywhat:

Police State Photo of the Day: In this striking photo by longtime Oregonian staff photographer Randy L. Rasmussen, an Occupy Portland protester gets a faceful of Mace during yesterday’s local Day of Action demonstration at Pioneer Courthouse Square.

Compare With: Joshua Trujillo’s now-iconic photo of 84-year-old Seattleite Dorli Rainey following a similar encounter with the nozzle end of a pepper spray can.

[oregonian.]

“Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.” - John F. Kennedy

“I object to violence because when it appears to do good, the good is only temporary; the evil it does is permanent.” - Mohandas Gandhi

“He who joyfully marches to music in rank and file has already earned my contempt. He has been given a large brain by mistake, since for him the spinal cord would fully suffice. This disgrace to civilization should be done away with at once. Heroism at command, senseless brutality, deplorable love-of-country stance, how violently I hate all this, how despicable and ignoble war is; I would rather be torn to shreds than be a part of so base an action! It is my conviction that killing under the cloak of war is nothing but an act of murder” - Albert Einstein

“It is easier to lead men to combat, stirring up their passion, than to restrain them and direct them toward the patient labours of peace.” - Andre Gide

“I like to believe that people in the long run are going to do more to promote peace than our governments. Indeed, I think that people want peace so much that, one of these days, governments had better get out of the way and let them have it.” - Dwight D. Eisenhower 

“Peace cannot be achieved through violence, it can only be attained through understanding.” - Ralph Waldo Emerson

“Nonviolence is the answer to the crucial political and moral questions of our time; the need for mankind to overcome oppression and violence without resorting to oppression and violence. Mankind must evolve for all human conflict a method which rejects revenge, aggression, and retaliation. The foundation of such a method is love.” - Martin Luther King Jr.

“Peace and friendship with all mankind is our wisest policy, and I wish we may be permitted to pursue it.” - Thomas Jefferson

If everyone demanded peace instead of another television set, then there’d be peace.” - John Lennon

I don’t give an everliving fuck if you support Occupy Wall Street or not. The police have a duty, and that duty is to protect and keep things peaceful. That is their job, because them, these people do not have jobs. They should not be creating violence, they should be preventing it. I don’t care if a person was yelling and chanting, a policeman’s first reaction should not be to mace someone, it should be to calm them down in an appropriate manner.

I try to defend police officers, because I, unlike many others, understand that there are genuinely good people in the career that want to serve and protect. But when multiple individuals violate that, it just proves the stereotype that there are people who take advantage of that job and are just downright pigs. 

I will not ever be able to understand hurting someone. Ever. This image is powerful, though. The peace sign of the person in contrast to the individual getting maced makes it makes me question who in their right mind against the movement can look at such a picture and not question their moral standing.

^ This. This. THIS.

(Source: thedailywhat)

No longer Mayor Quan’s legal adviser. Resigned at 2 am. Support Occupy Oakland, not the 1% and its government facilitators.

Attorney Dan Siegel • Revealing that he resigned as Oakland mayor Jean Quan’s legal counsel, in protest of the treatment of Occupy protesters. In an early-morning raid of the camp, 32 people were arrested, including many clergy members. As we previously reported, the Occupy Oakland group received eviction notices Friday night, a day after a shooting death brought fresh negative focus onto the movement. source (viafollow)

To resign in this economic climate is a bold move. Well done.

(via mohandasgandhi)

(Source: shortformblog, via abokononist-deactivated20120714)

OCCUPY WALL STREET and its allied movements around the country are more than a walk in the park. They are most likely the start of a new era in America. Historians have noted that American politics moves in long swings. We are at the end of the 30-year Reagan era, a period that has culminated in soaring income for the top 1 percent and crushing unemployment or income stagnation for much of the rest. The overarching challenge of the coming years is to restore prosperity and power for the 99 percent.
Jeffrey Sachs, author of “The Price of Civilization: Reawakening American Virtue and Prosperity,” in a commentary, The New Progressive Movement - NYTimes.com (via tartantambourine)

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

I feel so energized. It’s amazing what a little pepper spray will do for you.
Dorli Rainer, the 84-year-old woman pepper sprayed at Occupy Seattle: Eighty-four-year-old activist Dorli Rainey tells Keith about her experience getting pepper-sprayed by the police during an Occupy Seattle demonstration and the need to take action and spread the word of the Occupy movement. She cites the advice of the late Catholic nun and activist Jackie Hudson to “take one more step out of your comfort zone” as an inspiration, saying, “It would be so easy to say, ‘Well I’m going to retire, I’m going to sit around, watch television or eat bonbons,’ but somebody’s got to keep ’em awake and let ’em know what is really going on in this world.” (via theatlantic)

(via shortformblog)

thepoliticalnotebook:

Police arrest about 70 protesters in a nighttime raid of Zuccotti Park. Hundreds of police, some in riot gear, cleared the park over the span of three hours. Protesters will apparently be allowed to return, but with no tents, and I’m assuming no intention of mass encampment. 
Above are photos of an officer clashing with a few protesters. Many of the protesters resisted the raid, some chaining themselves to trees. All photos taken by Don Emmert/AFP/Getty.
thepoliticalnotebook:

Police arrest about 70 protesters in a nighttime raid of Zuccotti Park. Hundreds of police, some in riot gear, cleared the park over the span of three hours. Protesters will apparently be allowed to return, but with no tents, and I’m assuming no intention of mass encampment. 
Above are photos of an officer clashing with a few protesters. Many of the protesters resisted the raid, some chaining themselves to trees. All photos taken by Don Emmert/AFP/Getty.
thepoliticalnotebook:

Police arrest about 70 protesters in a nighttime raid of Zuccotti Park. Hundreds of police, some in riot gear, cleared the park over the span of three hours. Protesters will apparently be allowed to return, but with no tents, and I’m assuming no intention of mass encampment. 
Above are photos of an officer clashing with a few protesters. Many of the protesters resisted the raid, some chaining themselves to trees. All photos taken by Don Emmert/AFP/Getty.

thepoliticalnotebook:

Police arrest about 70 protesters in a nighttime raid of Zuccotti Park. Hundreds of police, some in riot gear, cleared the park over the span of three hours. Protesters will apparently be allowed to return, but with no tents, and I’m assuming no intention of mass encampment. 

Above are photos of an officer clashing with a few protesters. Many of the protesters resisted the raid, some chaining themselves to trees. All photos taken by Don Emmert/AFP/Getty.

(via pantslessprogressive)

A Lonely Voice Of Reason Stands Up To Fox News' Smears Of Occupy Wall Street

abaldwin360:

by Andy Newbold | mediamatters.org

First the hosts condemned Jesse Jackson for comparing the Occupy Wall Street movement to the Civil Rights movement. Greg Gutfeld described Jackson’s comments as an example of “the usual suspects fading in relevance, salvaging careers, by exploiting class envy.” Williams responded by saying that Jackson was “absolutely right” and pointed out that all great examples of social change in America had come about because of protests:

WILLIAMS: Yeah, he’s absolutely right when you think about the idea that there’s very little change in our country and any society without struggle, without people putting themselves out. You know, Dr. King used to talk about the idea of creative struggle, creative tension. That you would create situations with marches and protests and some cases even break the law. That’s why King went to jail. You stop and think about things like the Vietnam War movement, you think about the feminist movement to get votes in this country.

When Gutfeld responded by calling Occupy Wall Street protesters “annoying,” Williams retorted that if Gutfeld had been in Birmingham in the ’60s, he would have labeled King a “northern agitator.”

Bolling also claimed Occupy Wall Street had no “overall message, that’s the problem.” Williams had to add another dose of sanity to the discussion after that, pointing out that the overall concern of Occupy Wall Street is “income inequality” and that is a message that “a good number of Americans embrace.”

Again, immediately after Williams finished his statement, he was attacked by his co-hosts for supporting violent people who, according to Gutfeld, are “reflective” of the overall movement.

Williams called out his fellow co-hosts for claiming that isolated events reflect the entire Occupy Wall Street movement:

WILLIAMS: I don’t think those people are reflective of Occupy Wall Street movements all over this country. I mean Atlanta, Baltimore, it goes on and on. And you guys pick out one specific place with one specific — and Kimberly talks about rapes and bad behavior as if you’re condemning the whole movement.

Later, co-host Kimberly Guilfoyle then tried to claim that Occupy Wall Street is a socialist movement and Bolling attacked the movement for supporting income redistribution. Williams responded:

WILLIAMS: You guys say: “You know what, what’s been going on in this country is just fine and dandy.” [Co-host] Dana [Perino] rightly says we need to have changes, and Dana has her own set of prescriptions. We might disagree, but she has policy prescriptions. If these are folks who say, “let’s have change; we’re tired of the big guys who control the politicians, control Wall Street, looking out for themselves and screwing everybody else,” you guys say: “Oh don’t raise a fuss. Don’t inconvenience us. Don’t block traffic.”

Gutfeld then interrupted to say Occupy Wall Street protesters should be more like the tea party who protested “peacefully with permits” adding “nobody got arrested, nobody got raped, nobody got assaulted.” 

Williams responded by pointing out the real reason why the other co-hosts were so eager to attack Occupy Wall Street:

WILLIAMS: The reasons you guys are so afraid of Occupy Wall Street is —

GUTFELD: Because they’re violent.

WILLIAMS: — because they have the power to change the national narrative and to elect not only Obama, but to elect Democrats in this country.

Bolling then claimed that Occupy Wall Street wanted to change the system away from capitalism. And Williams had to set him straight:

WILLIAMS: Nobody is suggesting there’s anything better than capitalism.

BOLLING: No, they all are.

WILLIAMS: I’m a big capitalist. You’re a capitalist, and those folks out there are capitalists.

BOLLING: Are not capitalists.

WILLIAMS: They are.

[crosstalk]

WILLIAMS: But let me tell you something. Those are capitalists. You know what?

BOLLING: Self-described non-capitalists.

WILLIAMS: Let me tell you something: There are some things like excesses to every structure. And when you have the bankers and the Wall Street guys gobbling at the trough like greedy pigs, then somebody should say something.

So, Fox (“News”) again attempted to mocksmear, and vilify the Occupy Wall Street protesters in an effort to continue pushing the network’s political agenda. But at least this time, Williams was there to provide a dose of reality.

[SOURCE & VIDEO]

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)

liberal-life:

Police Actions and Media Coverage of Occupy Wall Street
Nate Silver looked at OWS coverage in a database of about 4,000 U.S.  news sources. He found that media coverage was basically nonexistent  until NYPD pepper sprayed some protesters. Coverage shot up again after  NYPD arrested a few hundred protesters on the Brooklyn Bridge on Oct.  1st and after more incidents on Oct. 5th. (This does not included the latest data after the violence in Oakland)
As Silver points out, we can’t discern any clear causality here; perhaps  media coverage would have gone up over time anyway. But coverage of OWS  doesn’t show a smooth, slowly-increasing trend; coverage jumped after  each of these instances of violence, and after the Brooklyn Bridge  arrests, remained much higher than it had been before. At the very  least, it appears that violence by the police drew media attention,  providing an opening for the concerns of OWS protesters — and the  persistence and growth of OWS protests around the country — to be  defined as legitimate news stories in their own right.

liberal-life:

Police Actions and Media Coverage of Occupy Wall Street

Nate Silver looked at OWS coverage in a database of about 4,000 U.S. news sources. He found that media coverage was basically nonexistent until NYPD pepper sprayed some protesters. Coverage shot up again after NYPD arrested a few hundred protesters on the Brooklyn Bridge on Oct. 1st and after more incidents on Oct. 5th. (This does not included the latest data after the violence in Oakland)

As Silver points out, we can’t discern any clear causality here; perhaps media coverage would have gone up over time anyway. But coverage of OWS doesn’t show a smooth, slowly-increasing trend; coverage jumped after each of these instances of violence, and after the Brooklyn Bridge arrests, remained much higher than it had been before. At the very least, it appears that violence by the police drew media attention, providing an opening for the concerns of OWS protesters — and the persistence and growth of OWS protests around the country — to be defined as legitimate news stories in their own right.

(via liberal-life-deactivated2011110)

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