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timelightbox:

Nov. 7, 2012. President Obama celebrates with first lady Michelle Obama and their daughters Malia and Sasha at their election night victory rally in Chicago. (photo: Kevin Lamarque—Reuters)
From President Obama’s reelection and Superstorm Sandy’s aftermath to a deadly earthquake in Guatemala and a train cemetery in Bolivia, TIME presents the best photographs of the week.
See more photos here.

timelightbox:

Nov. 7, 2012. President Obama celebrates with first lady Michelle Obama and their daughters Malia and Sasha at their election night victory rally in Chicago. (photo: Kevin Lamarque—Reuters)

From President Obama’s reelection and Superstorm Sandy’s aftermath to a deadly earthquake in Guatemala and a train cemetery in Bolivia, TIME presents the best photographs of the week.

See more photos here.

timelightbox:

Sept. 3, 2012. 7-year-old Michah Robinson poses in a souvenir photo booth at the Carolina Fest street festival during preparations for the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C.
From an eruption on the sun and the death of Rev. Sun Myung Moon in South Korea to Redhead Day in the Netherlands and students heading back to school around the world, TIME presents the best images of the week. 
See more photos here.

timelightbox:

Sept. 3, 2012. 7-year-old Michah Robinson poses in a souvenir photo booth at the Carolina Fest street festival during preparations for the Democratic National Convention in Charlotte, N.C.

From an eruption on the sun and the death of Rev. Sun Myung Moon in South Korea to Redhead Day in the Netherlands and students heading back to school around the world, TIME presents the best images of the week. 

See more photos here.


braiker:

Hurricane Irene was no big deal for most of us. But she damaged a few lives, and we should know that. 
inothernews:

Billy Stinson comforts his daughter, Erin, as they sit on the  steps where their cottage once stood in Nags Head, North Carolina. The home, built in 1903 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was destroyed by Hurricane Irene.  (Photo: Getty Images via the New York Post)

braiker:

Hurricane Irene was no big deal for most of us. But she damaged a few lives, and we should know that. 

inothernews:

Billy Stinson comforts his daughter, Erin, as they sit on the steps where their cottage once stood in Nags Head, North Carolina. The home, built in 1903 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was destroyed by Hurricane Irene.  (Photo: Getty Images via the New York Post)

futurejournalismproject:

The Staging of a Photo-Op
While not iconic like the Situation Room photograph released by the White House that’s now being memed, images of Barack Obama at the lectern announcing the Osama Bin Laden mission got their fare share of play in newspapers, magazines and Web sites.
But those images are staged. Take it away Jason Reed:

As President Obama continued his nine-minute address in front of just one main network camera, the photographers were held outside the room by staff and asked to remain completely silent. Once Obama was off the air, we were escorted in front of that teleprompter and the President then re-enacted the walk-out and first 30 seconds of the statement for us.

As Poynter notes, this practice isn’t new. It apparently happens all the time and is something to consider as we decide whether what we’re looking at is documentary or agitprop.
Via Poynter’s Al Tompkins:

Other photographers who work at the White House told Poynter.org that since the Reagan era (and possibly before) it has been the standard operating procedure that during a live presidential address, still cameras are not allowed to photograph the actual event…
…But this practice of re-enacting a historic speech flies directly in the face of the National Press Photographers Association Code of Ethics, which includes this relevant passage: “Resist being manipulated by staged photo opportunities.”

Aside: About that meme? Personal fav. — Michael

futurejournalismproject:

The Staging of a Photo-Op

While not iconic like the Situation Room photograph released by the White House that’s now being memed, images of Barack Obama at the lectern announcing the Osama Bin Laden mission got their fare share of play in newspapers, magazines and Web sites.

But those images are staged. Take it away Jason Reed:

As President Obama continued his nine-minute address in front of just one main network camera, the photographers were held outside the room by staff and asked to remain completely silent. Once Obama was off the air, we were escorted in front of that teleprompter and the President then re-enacted the walk-out and first 30 seconds of the statement for us.

As Poynter notes, this practice isn’t new. It apparently happens all the time and is something to consider as we decide whether what we’re looking at is documentary or agitprop.

Via Poynter’s Al Tompkins:

Other photographers who work at the White House told Poynter.org that since the Reagan era (and possibly before) it has been the standard operating procedure that during a live presidential address, still cameras are not allowed to photograph the actual event…

…But this practice of re-enacting a historic speech flies directly in the face of the National Press Photographers Association Code of Ethics, which includes this relevant passage: “Resist being manipulated by staged photo opportunities.”

Aside: About that meme? Personal fav. — Michael

(Source: futurejournalismproject)