politicalprof

politicalprof:

kohenari:

NBC pre-empted the first quarter of tonight’s 49ers-Patriots game to show President Obama’s speech at the Newtown memorial for victims of the Sandy Hook shooting. As you might expect, many football fans didn’t take kindly to this.

I’m not posting any of the tweets here; if you haven’t seen them and have an interest in the names and faces of the dregs of humanity, you can go see for yourself how unabashed racism, love of guns, love of televised sports, and hatred of government all mix together.

It’s interesting to see how many of these people have already deleted their Twitter accounts; I suppose they’ll just stick to being racist morons offline from now on. Even more interesting, though, are the geniuses who have kept their accounts and are defending themselves: “Hey, I was just making a joke.” Or, “I always talk like this about everyone.” Or, “People take everything too seriously.” Or, “I’m on the news!”

Of course, if there weren’t a ton of racist morons out there, I’m not sure what I’d write about

Politicalprof: this is incredibly hard to read, but it is a real part of America …

annaverity

annaetc:


paxamericana
:

Michele Smith Became The First Female Analyst For A National Baseball Broadcast Yesterday. Here’s How Viewers Reacted.

TBS broke unprecedented ground Sunday when they put analyst Michele Smith in the booth alongside Ernie Johnson and John Smoltz for their broadcast of the Dodgers-Braves game. It’s the first time a woman has ever served in the commentary role for a national MLB broadcast, and is one of a handful of breakthroughs in a summer that marks the 40th anniversary of the passage of Title IX.

Smith won two Olympic gold medals as a softballer, and is a member of the Softball Hall Of Fame. She’s certainly an expert on softball, having served as one of ESPN’s chief announcers for the sport, and testing her out for an MLB broadcast was an interesting idea. (It’s also one announced with surprisingly little fanfare; we only learned of the broadcast today.) Here’s baseball blogger William Tasker’s take:

She also knew what she was talking about. Her insights were usually spot on. The one awkwardness of the entire broadcast was the incessant pandering of the two men on the broadcast team to talk about or bring up Smith’s softball exploits. Such pandering was probably meant to make Smith as comfortable as possible, but it also gave the impression that such comments were needed to justify Smith’s existence on the broadcast. From a personal standpoint, during a broadcast, the less said about the broadcaster the better. Concentrate on what is going on in the field.

This is why we can’t have nice things.

timelightbox
timelightbox:

Olympic gymnast Gabby Douglas eats breakfast while stretching on the stairs of her host family’s home in Des Moines, Iowa.
In his portrait series of gold-medal hopefuls for TIME’s 2012 Olympics special issue, Martin Schoeller shows three U.S. team members—gymnast Gabby Douglas, runner Lolo Jones and swimmer Ryan Lochte—whose passion for sport isn’t contained by training center walls.
See more photos here.

timelightbox:

Olympic gymnast Gabby Douglas eats breakfast while stretching on the stairs of her host family’s home in Des Moines, Iowa.

In his portrait series of gold-medal hopefuls for TIME’s 2012 Olympics special issue, Martin Schoeller shows three U.S. team members—gymnast Gabby Douglas, runner Lolo Jones and swimmer Ryan Lochte—whose passion for sport isn’t contained by training center walls.

See more photos here.

gotemcoach
gotemcoach:

On February 3rd, the New York Knicks lost to the Boston Celtics.  Third-string point guard Jeremy Lin played just over six and a half minutes.  He missed all three of his shots and turned the ball over once to boot.
The next day, Jeremy Lin scored 25 points, dished out 7 assists, and had 4 rebounds in 35 minutes.  Ever since, basketball fans have been inundated with Jeremy Lin news, Jeremy Lin back story, and worst of all, a seemingly unending stream of tired Jeremy Lin puns.
I mean, honestly.  If Russia ever found out how many man hours we’ve spent thinking of words that start with “IN,” they’d invade.  Our nation would surely fall.
In the span of a week, Jeremy Lin went from being an interesting story, to a great story, to an obnoxious story.  Then last night happened.
As I do every year, I made the decision to eat cereal for a week, so I could afford to buy a ticket to see the Los Angeles Lakers’ only trip to Madison Square Garden.  I paid for Kobe. I got my money’s worth from Lin.
After missing the Knicks’ first shot, Lin scored the Knicks’ first basket - a 22-foot three pointer.  He followed that up with an assist to Tyson Chandler, a 19-footer, another assist to Tyson Chandler, a 16-footer, and a steal which he took in for a breakaway layup.
Timeout Los Angeles Lakers.  It was an ambush.

After establishing his outside game (a supposed weakness), Lin went inside, shooting runners in the lane, and finishing at the basket with his soon-to-be-patented spin move (no doubt regrettably called the “Lin Cycle”…here come the Russians!!!).  He had 18 by halftime. 
When Lin continued his attack in the 3rd, the Lakers’ big men adjusted, but so did Jeremy, on the fly.  He drew contact, and either got to the free throw line, or kicked the ball outside to his teammates.  When Kobe Bryant willed the Lakers back within 3 during the 4th quarter, and the Knicks needed Lin the most, he was there.  He was there, like a battle-tested, “been there before,” cold-blooded killer.   Ice cold, Jack.
A rebound, an assist, another rebound, and a 19-footer he stroked right in Pau Gasol’s Spanish face.  In 83 seconds, the Knicks lead was back to 9.  Timeout Los Angeles.  Déjà vu.

Lin wasn’t done.  It was time to keep working the outside.  The Lakers were on their heels.  On three consecutive plays, the Knicks’ new starting point guard stuck another long jump shot, followed by Kobe missing one of his own, after which Lin drilled another three pointer.  Game over.  The last two of his career-high 38-points came when Lin sliced through the Lakers’ Top 5 team defense, then deftly slipped past the 7-foot Gasol, to reverse his layup.
I couldn’t even see it.  I had to ask someone.  The two guys in front of me were hugging.  And screaming at each other.  I’ve never heard Madison Square Garden louder.

I spent the whole game mystified.  At times it seemed like the fans were carrying Lin to new heights - as though the raucous applause and booming MVP chants were fueling him.  At other times, Lin was the one waking up the crowd, snatching momentum back for his Knicks.  Was Jeremy Lin’s confidence through the roof because the fans were cheering him on?  Or were the fans cheering him on because his confidence put him in the zone?
I spent a lot of time (read as: “almost all of it”) trying to decide whether Jeremy Lin was legit or not.  Did I just want him to be legit?  The Garden faithful clearly wanted him to be legit, so was that emotion affecting me?  Is “legit” even really a word?  Don’t I have to say “legitimate?”
I just kept asking myself, “Is Jeremy Lin for real?”  During timeouts.  In between plays.  Over and over and over.  And then the answer hit me.
It doesn’t matter.
I saw one hell of a performance at 32nd and 7th in New York City.  Maybe it wasn’t Kobe’s 61, but it was quite similarly supernatural.  Tonight, I saw a human being, just like you and me, not just overcome his opponent, but overcome the limitations of his own body and mind, to excel at the highest level.  Whether he becomes the next Walt Frazier doesn’t matter.  Tonight, Jeremy Lin touched greatness.  Tonight, Jeremy Lin was Great.
Isn’t that why we watch sports?  Don’t we hope to see something amazing?  That’s why I wrote this.  I needed to tell you to turn on your televisions.  Go to the Garden.  Find out when the Knicks come to town.  Don’t miss what’s going on because you’re trying to analyze it.  Just take the time to enjoy this.
Granted, I don’t exactly know what this is, but I do know it’s special.
Or maybe I’m just certifiably Linsane?
@gotem_coach

gotemcoach:

On February 3rd, the New York Knicks lost to the Boston Celtics.  Third-string point guard Jeremy Lin played just over six and a half minutes.  He missed all three of his shots and turned the ball over once to boot.

The next day, Jeremy Lin scored 25 points, dished out 7 assists, and had 4 rebounds in 35 minutes.  Ever since, basketball fans have been inundated with Jeremy Lin news, Jeremy Lin back story, and worst of all, a seemingly unending stream of tired Jeremy Lin puns.

I mean, honestly.  If Russia ever found out how many man hours we’ve spent thinking of words that start with “IN,” they’d invade.  Our nation would surely fall.

In the span of a week, Jeremy Lin went from being an interesting story, to a great story, to an obnoxious story.  Then last night happened.

As I do every year, I made the decision to eat cereal for a week, so I could afford to buy a ticket to see the Los Angeles Lakers’ only trip to Madison Square Garden.  I paid for Kobe. I got my money’s worth from Lin.

After missing the Knicks’ first shot, Lin scored the Knicks’ first basket - a 22-foot three pointer.  He followed that up with an assist to Tyson Chandler, a 19-footer, another assist to Tyson Chandler, a 16-footer, and a steal which he took in for a breakaway layup.

Timeout Los Angeles Lakers.  It was an ambush.

image

After establishing his outside game (a supposed weakness), Lin went inside, shooting runners in the lane, and finishing at the basket with his soon-to-be-patented spin move (no doubt regrettably called the “Lin Cycle”…here come the Russians!!!).  He had 18 by halftime. 

When Lin continued his attack in the 3rd, the Lakers’ big men adjusted, but so did Jeremy, on the fly.  He drew contact, and either got to the free throw line, or kicked the ball outside to his teammates.  When Kobe Bryant willed the Lakers back within 3 during the 4th quarter, and the Knicks needed Lin the most, he was there.  He was there, like a battle-tested, “been there before,” cold-blooded killer.   Ice cold, Jack.

A rebound, an assist, another rebound, and a 19-footer he stroked right in Pau Gasol’s Spanish face.  In 83 seconds, the Knicks lead was back to 9.  Timeout Los Angeles.  Déjà vu.

image

Lin wasn’t done.  It was time to keep working the outside.  The Lakers were on their heels.  On three consecutive plays, the Knicks’ new starting point guard stuck another long jump shot, followed by Kobe missing one of his own, after which Lin drilled another three pointer.  Game over.  The last two of his career-high 38-points came when Lin sliced through the Lakers’ Top 5 team defense, then deftly slipped past the 7-foot Gasol, to reverse his layup.

I couldn’t even see it.  I had to ask someone.  The two guys in front of me were hugging.  And screaming at each other.  I’ve never heard Madison Square Garden louder.

image

I spent the whole game mystified.  At times it seemed like the fans were carrying Lin to new heights - as though the raucous applause and booming MVP chants were fueling him.  At other times, Lin was the one waking up the crowd, snatching momentum back for his Knicks.  Was Jeremy Lin’s confidence through the roof because the fans were cheering him on?  Or were the fans cheering him on because his confidence put him in the zone?

I spent a lot of time (read as: “almost all of it”) trying to decide whether Jeremy Lin was legit or not.  Did I just want him to be legit?  The Garden faithful clearly wanted him to be legit, so was that emotion affecting me?  Is “legit” even really a word?  Don’t I have to say “legitimate?”

I just kept asking myself, “Is Jeremy Lin for real?”  During timeouts.  In between plays.  Over and over and over.  And then the answer hit me.

It doesn’t matter.

I saw one hell of a performance at 32nd and 7th in New York City.  Maybe it wasn’t Kobe’s 61, but it was quite similarly supernatural.  Tonight, I saw a human being, just like you and me, not just overcome his opponent, but overcome the limitations of his own body and mind, to excel at the highest level.  Whether he becomes the next Walt Frazier doesn’t matter.  Tonight, Jeremy Lin touched greatness.  Tonight, Jeremy Lin was Great.

Isn’t that why we watch sports?  Don’t we hope to see something amazing?  That’s why I wrote this.  I needed to tell you to turn on your televisions.  Go to the Garden.  Find out when the Knicks come to town.  Don’t miss what’s going on because you’re trying to analyze it.  Just take the time to enjoy this.

Granted, I don’t exactly know what this is, but I do know it’s special.

Or maybe I’m just certifiably Linsane?

@gotem_coach

brooklynmutt
thedailyfeed:

Last night’s Daily Show had some synergy with The Daily that went beyond sharing an awesome name. Jon Stewart capped off his monologue on accused child rapist Jerry Sandusky by referencing our scoop on his lawyer, Joe Amendola, who in 1996 impregnated a teenager when he was 49 years old. Watch for it at minute 3:46. Thanks, Daily Show!

thedailyfeed:

Last night’s Daily Show had some synergy with The Daily that went beyond sharing an awesome name. Jon Stewart capped off his monologue on accused child rapist Jerry Sandusky by referencing our scoop on his lawyer, Joe Amendola, who in 1996 impregnated a teenager when he was 49 years old. Watch for it at minute 3:46. Thanks, Daily Show!

brooklynmutt
yahoopolitics:

“I was mentioning to some of the basketball players who were here that this is like the second quarter, maybe the third, and we’ve still got a lot of work to do. But I want everybody to know I’m a fourth-quarter player,” Obama said at a private fundraiser in Orlando, Fla., on Tuesday night. “So I don’t miss my shots in the fourth quarter. ”
—Obama likens 2012 election to basketball

yahoopolitics:

“I was mentioning to some of the basketball players who were here that this is like the second quarter, maybe the third, and we’ve still got a lot of work to do. But I want everybody to know I’m a fourth-quarter player,” Obama said at a private fundraiser in Orlando, Fla., on Tuesday night. “So I don’t miss my shots in the fourth quarter. ”

Obama likens 2012 election to basketball

inothernews
inothernews:

From the New York Times:

In his 18 years at Pinckney Community High School, Jim Darga, the  principal, said, the homecoming queen had always been crowned at  halftime of the school’s football game. Never before, though, had she  had to be summoned from the team’s locker room. 
 And that was just the beginning of Brianna Amat’s big night. 
 If being named homecoming queen is a lifetime memory for a high school  student, so, too, is kicking a winning field goal. For Amat, 18, they  happened within an hour of each other. 
 On Friday, with Pinckney leading powerful Michigan rival Grand Blanc,  6-0, at the half, Amat, the first girl to play football for the school’s  varsity, was asked to return to the field. When she arrived, she was  told that her fellow students had voted her queen. When the tiara was  placed on her head, she was wearing not a dress, like the other girls in  the homecoming court, but her No. 12 uniform, pads and all. 
 A short while later, with five minutes to play in the third quarter,  Amat was called to the same field to attempt a 31-yard field goal. She  split the uprights. 
 The kick proved decisive as Pinckney held on for a 9-7 victory against a  Grand Blanc team that had come into the game ranked seventh in the  state in its division. It also earned Amat the nickname the Kicking  Queen. 

(Photo of Pinckney High School kicker Brianna Amat at practice by Stephen McGee / The New York Times)

inothernews:

From the New York Times:

In his 18 years at Pinckney Community High School, Jim Darga, the principal, said, the homecoming queen had always been crowned at halftime of the school’s football game. Never before, though, had she had to be summoned from the team’s locker room.

And that was just the beginning of Brianna Amat’s big night.

If being named homecoming queen is a lifetime memory for a high school student, so, too, is kicking a winning field goal. For Amat, 18, they happened within an hour of each other.

On Friday, with Pinckney leading powerful Michigan rival Grand Blanc, 6-0, at the half, Amat, the first girl to play football for the school’s varsity, was asked to return to the field. When she arrived, she was told that her fellow students had voted her queen. When the tiara was placed on her head, she was wearing not a dress, like the other girls in the homecoming court, but her No. 12 uniform, pads and all.

A short while later, with five minutes to play in the third quarter, Amat was called to the same field to attempt a 31-yard field goal. She split the uprights.

The kick proved decisive as Pinckney held on for a 9-7 victory against a Grand Blanc team that had come into the game ranked seventh in the state in its division. It also earned Amat the nickname the Kicking Queen.

(Photo of Pinckney High School kicker Brianna Amat at practice by Stephen McGee / The New York Times)